2018_Hupfield_gExhibition view, Maria Hupfield. The One Who Keeps On Giving, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Maria Hupfield. The One Who Keeps On Giving

Curator: Carolin Köchling

January 11 - March 3, 2018
Opening: Wednesday, January 10, 5:30 p.m.
Extended hours and special activities for Nuit blanche à Montréal: March 3, 2018

Exhibition organized and circulated by The Power Plant, Toronto

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Objects contain meanings beyond their materiality, meanings that we bring to them or receive from them. Maria Hupfield’s artistic practice is interested in revealing the way objects can trigger relationships between humans or environments. For her exhibition, Hupfield developed a video installation centred on an object: an oil painting of a seascape by her late mother. The artist invited her siblings to participate in a performance rooted in memories evoked by the painting. Alongside this newly commissioned work, the exhibition includes a selection of felt objects that have been regularly activated during Hupfield’s performances in recent years: a canoe, a snowsuit, a snowmobile helmet, mitts and boots, a cassette recorder with headphones, a light bulb. The One Who Keeps On Giving is an English translation of Maria Hupfield’s mother’s Anishinaabe name.

2018_Bui_gMichelle Bui, Happy Like Doris Day (with garlic), 2017, inkjet print on adhesive polypropylene, 244 x 152 cm.

Michelle Bui. Pool of Plenty

Graduating master’s student in visual and media arts (MFA), UQAM

January 11 – March 3, 2018
Opening: Wednesday, January 10, 5:30 p.m.
Extended hours and special activities for Nuit blanche à Montréal: March 3, 2018

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Pool of Plenty deals with material culture by suggesting that consciousness of identity, generally shaped by written language, can also be articulated through the things that surround us. Objects, materials, food and plants are first selected for their availability and their tactile qualities before being assembled to form a series of images revealing their fragility, malleability and the temporality they inhabit. Photography, sometimes abandoned by the artist in favour of sculpture, oscillates between metaphor and raw materiality, thus reinforcing the status of the image as object. With references to the still life and to advertising industry packshots, the artist's pictorial research responds to a desire to materialize cravings, to give them life through the object, to seduce via the visceral and confront via surfaces.

2018_Terriens_gExhibition view, Earthlings, Esker Foundation, Calgary, 2017. Photo: John Dean

Earthlings

Curator: Shary Boyle, in collaboration with Shauna Thompson

Artists: Roger Aksadjuak, Shuvinai Ashoona, Pierre Aupilardjuk, Shary Boyle, Jessie Kenalogak, John Kurok, Leo Napayok

March 10 – April 14, 2018
Opening: Saturday, March 10, 3 p.m.

Exhibition organized and circulated by Esker Foundation, Calgary

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We are of the earth and from the stars, cooked mud and pigmented wax, soot and soda, ink, wood, tobacco, fur, fire, bronze, and acrylic nails – mortal inhabitants of the earth dreaming of our spiritual or extraterrestrial foil. Drawn from this framework of earthly conditions, the visionary ceramics and works on paper of Earthlings, produced both individually and collaboratively by seven contemporary artists, are at once transformative and otherworldly – and profoundly human. Though making work from distinct cultural and geographical positions – from Kangiqliniq/Rankin Inlet, Kinngait/Cape Dorset, Qamani’tuaq/Baker Lake, and Toronto – the artists in Earthlings share an intuitive and labour-intensive approach to materials and narrative imagery. In these works, detailed figures are subject to transformations and transmogrifications, hybrid blendings of animal and human, reality and myth, and actual and imagined spaces. These pieces seem to emerge from phantasmagorical worlds, simultaneously fleshly and physical, sensual and spiritual, alien and familiar.

2018_Majeri_gLeyla Majeri, Harness the Sun (detail), 2016, plaster, plastic bag, hand-dyed paper, dimensions variable

Leyla Majeri. Don't Blame Us If We Get Playful

Graduating master’s student in visual and media arts (MFA), UQAM

March 10 - April 14, 2018
Opening: Saturday, March 10, 3 p.m.

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In a garden, the more we focus on understanding, interpreting, maintaining, delimiting and controlling the spirit of a thing that escapes and surprises us, the more blurred the distinction becomes between the act of cultivation and the cultivated object. The garden is a space in which various energies and intentions are at work and where human and non-human activities, including those of organisms, chemicals, waste and climate, are deeply entangled and merged. So much so that plants and people are transformed there and, so to speak, "reciprocally cultivated". In this sense, Leyla Majeri grasps the garden as a performative site, where fantasies directed at and arising from nature take shape and evanesce. Her project, Don't Blame Us If We Get Playful, is a sensitive and highly fanciful discourse, reflecting the complexity and ambiguity of our relationships to the "other". Here, the residue of ideologies opposing nature and culture serves as a substratum, like ruins, for imagining new gardens, dissident landscapes, anti-Edens.

2018_Passage_gExhibition view, Passage à découvert 2017, Galerie de l’UQAM, 2017

Passage à découvert 2018

Graduating students in visual and media arts (BFA), UQAM

April 27 - May 5, 2018
Opening: Thursday, April 26, 5:30 p.m

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Passage à découvert is an opportunity to discover the works of tomorrow’s contemporary artists and teachers who will take their place in museums, galleries and schools. The exhibition illustrates the students’ creative vitality, curiosity and freedom and bears witness to recent graduates’ professionalism and the excitement that their projects stir up. Presented each year, this exhibition also reveals the wealth and diversity of the programs offered by the École des arts visuels et médiatiques, which favours a multidisciplinary education.

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RADAR 2018. The Reign of Nausea

Curators: Doriane Biot, Véronique Hudon, Camille Richard, Marie Tissot
Coordinator: Philippe Dumaine

May 16 – June 16, 2018
Opening: Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 5:30 p.m

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Galerie de l’UQAM is launching RADAR, a new initiative whereby four students from UQAM's graduate programs in Art History, Museology and Visual Arts will contribute to defining, developing and organising an exhibition. Each year, RADAR intends to structure a set of works, including some from the Collection d’oeuvres d’art de l’UQAM, around a specific issue. This year, as August marks the 70th anniversary of the publication of Refus global, Galerie de l’UQAM plans to explore our current society and the engagement of its artists. Entitled The Reign of Nausea, this inaugural edition of RADAR will present works that reveal the blue fears, red fears and white fears alluded to by Paul-Émile Borduas in the Refus global manifesto. In today’s world, we have every reason to experience emotional turmoil similar to that of Borduas and his colleagues in 1948. It seems more and more impossible to avoid this sensation of nausea. 70 years after the Refus global, it seems necessary to raise this topic. RADAR 2018 will explore contemporary "nauseas" and how current artists are confronting them.

2018_Laferte-Coutu_gAlexia Laferté-Coutu, Monument National (left), 2017, cast glass, 36.8 x 22.9 x 5.8 cm and Sans titre (right), 2017, cast glass, graphite, blue oxide, 34.3 x 21.6 x 3.8 cm

Alexia Laferté-Coutu. Variations sur une ombre plusieurs fois centenaire

Graduating master’s student in visual and media arts (MFA), UQAM

May 16 – June 16, 2018
Opening: Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 5:30 p.m

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Through the gesture of soft clay pressing against the exterior surface of historic buildings, Alexia Laferté-Coutu seeks to generate an active relationship to sculpture. She associates this sculptural gesture with the process of cataplasm, an ancient therapy that consisted in temporarily applying a thick paste (clay, plants) onto part of the body in order to absorb toxins. In architectural conservation, this same process is used to clean architectural segments that have been buried under an accumulation of lead dust or pollutants. The application of a paste based on clay and active agents derived from red algae absorbs impurities adhering to the surface of the architecture, thus revealing ancient frescoes, engravings, carved friezes or facades of particular cultural value. In this installation, glass cataplasms crystallized through molding free themselves from their status as objects by suggesting unidentifiable forms and their ever absent positive.



Canada Council for the Arts Canada Council for the Arts

GALERIE DE L’UQAM

Université du Québec à Montréal
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