2018_Terriens2_gShary Boyle & John Kurok, Sugluk, 2016, porcelain, 20 x 46 x 30 cm. Private collection, photo: Rafael Goldchain

Earthlings

Curator: Shary Boyle, in collaboration with Shauna Thompson

Artists: Roger Aksadjuak, Shuvinai Ashoona, Pierre Aupilardjuk, Shary Boyle, Jessie Kenalogak, John Kurok, Leo Napayok

March 10 – April 14, 2018
Opening: Saturday, March 10, 3 p.m.

Exhibition organized and circulated by Esker Foundation, Calgary

[More information]

Starting March 10, Galerie de l’UQAM will be host to Earthlings, a major exhibition touring Canada since its presentation at Esker Foundation in Calgary at the beginning of 2017. The ceramics and works on paper of Earthlings, produced both individually and collaboratively by seven contemporary artists, including six Inuit artists, are at once visionary, transformative and otherworldly – and profoundly human.

Though making work from distinct cultural and geographical positions – from Kangiqliniq (Rankin Inlet), Kinngait (Cape Dorset), Qamani’tuaq (Baker Lake), and Toronto – the artists in Earthlings share an intuitive and labor-intensive approach to materials and narrative imagery. In these works, detailed figures are subject to transformations and transmogrifications, hybrid blendings of animal and human, reality and myth, and actual and imagined spaces. These pieces seem to emerge from phantasmagorical worlds, simultaneously fleshly and physical, sensual and spiritual, alien and familiar.

The exhibition is produced and circulated by Esker Foundation (Calgary).

The exhibition

Space, and how we occupy it, is a political as well as a practical concern. I wish to make small sculptures, slowly, with great care. An invitation to exhibit them at the Esker Foundation was a grand opportunity, on a generous scale. Who could I invite to join me at the table?

There are artists who work from their intuition, who channel their personal experience and cultural memory for narrative. These artists choose their subjects because they know them intimately, personally, physically. It is a way of working that is innate, and encourages a human conversation larger than art.

I think of this work, my own included, as “bridge art”; it spans between things, between people, animals, space, and the earth. It spans languages. It spans the real and the unreal. The living and the dead. The past and the future. It is art to communicate, through symbols, myths, dreams, and hybrids. It connects.

- Shary Boyle

The artists

Roger Aksadjuak’s work is complex, inventive, and embraces multiple forms and playful imagery while respecting traditional narratives. It can be found in many public and private collections across North America, including the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. His work Square Dance had the honor of being selected as the first artwork purchased by the Nunavut Legislative Assembly in Iqaluit. Roger Aksadjuak lived in Kangiqtiniq (Rankin Inlet); he passed away in 2014.

Shuvinai Ashoona is a contemporary artist based in Kinngait (Cape Dorset) whose work often combines reality and the imaginative. Her work has been shown in numerous exhibitions including SITElines Santa Fe: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas (2014-2015), SITE Santa Fe; Woven Thoughts (2014), Feheley Fine Arts, Toronto; and Oh, Canada (2012), Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams. Ashoona’s work is the collections of numerous major art institutions, including the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Canadian Museum of History, Gatineau; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; and the Winnipeg Art Gallery, among others.
dorsetfinearts.com/shuvinai-ashoona

Pierre Aupilardjuk’s artistic practice represents his strong roots in a traditional aesthetic. His work is included in the ceramics collection of the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, Yellowknife; the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; as well as in private collections throughout North America. He lives and works in Kangiqtiniq (Rankin Inlet). His work has been included in several exhibitions, including Modern Echoes: Contemporary Inuit Ceramics and Sculpture (2000), Native American Trading Company Gallery, Denver.

Shary Boyle lives in Toronto and works across diverse media, including sculpture, drawing, installation, and performance. Collected and exhibited internationally, Boyle represented Canada with her project Music for Silence at the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013. Shary Boyle's work was included in Ceramix: Art and Ceramics from Rodin to Schutte (2016), organized by the Bonnefantenmuseum, Maastricht, and la maison rouge, Paris. In 2017 her sculptures were featured in the Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale, and in the publication Vitamin C: Clay and Ceramic in Contemporary Art (Phaidon, London). Boyle’s first public art commission will be installed in spring 2018 on the front grounds of the Gardiner Ceramic Museum in Toronto.
sharyboyle.com

Jessie Kenalogak was born in Back River in the early 1950s and currently lives and works in Qamani'tuaq (Baker Lake). Working primarily in drawing, her most meaningful artistic influences came from her grandfather Angushadluk, one of the most important and respected artists ever to work in Baker Lake, and her aunt, Mary Singaqti, another highly respected Baker Lake artist. The titles of her drawings, her very personal interpretations of her work, serve as an expressive element of the overall work.

John Kurok began working full-time as a ceramist in 1996. His work emphasizes the relationships of forms and the visual movements created by those forms over the surface of the sculpture. His work has been shown at the Winnipeg Art Gallery; Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery, Waterloo; and the Cerny Inuit Collection, Bern. Kurok's work is included in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Museum of Inuit Art, Toronto. He is currently based in Kangiqtiniq (Rankin Inlet).

Born in the early sixties, Leo Napayok spent most of his time growing up in the towns of Salliq (Coral Harbour) and Kangiqtiniq (Rankin Inlet). Working in collaboration with other ceramicists who prepare a vessel or sculptural shape, Napayok then incises extraordinary designs that completely cover the sculpture’s surface. His collaborative work is included in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.

The curators

Shary Boyle – see above

Prior to joining Esker Foundation as a curator, Shauna Thompson was the curatorial assistant at the Walter Phillips Gallery, The Banff Centre. Thompson has also worked with the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery and YYZ Artists’ Outlet, both in Toronto, as well as the Art Gallery of Mississauga. Her writing has been published in Canadian Art as well as in numerous exhibition catalogs and texts. She currently sits on the Board of Directors at TRUCK Contemporary Art in Calgary. Thompson holds master's degrees in Curatorial Studies from the University of Toronto and in English from the University of Guelph.

The catalog

Earthlings is accompanied by a richly illustrated, trilingual catalog (French, English and Inuktitut). It is on sale at Galerie de l’UQAM.

Earthlings
Authors: Naomi Potter, Shary Boyle, Shauna Thompson and Heather Igloliorte
Editor: Esker Foundation
2017, 142 p., trilingual (French, English and Inuktitut)
$45

Free activities

Special presentation of Inuit sculptures from the Collection d’œuvres d’art de l’UQAM
Part of the L’art observe series
April 3, 2018, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Agora of the Judith-Jasmin Pavilion, UQAM
1400 Berri, Montréal
Free admission

The Collection d’œuvres d’art de l’UQAM, which contains more than 4,000 objects and works of art, includes a set of twenty sculptures by Inuit artists. On the occasion of a special presentation of these pieces at the Agora of the Judith-Jasmin Pavilion, the Montreal community will have the opportunity to appreciate the technical and artistic richness of these little-known works. Mediators will be on hand to provide more information about the works and the Collection d’œuvres d’art de l’UQAM.

Guided tours of the exhibition for groups
Available anytime.
Reservations required with Philippe Dumaine
514 987-3000, ext 3280, or dumaine_allard.philippe@uqam.ca

Support provided by

CCFA_BW_black_96_e     Calq_noir   

Esker_noir

2018_Majeri2_gLeyla Majeri, There, for a second, 2017, hand-dyed paper, plastic bag

Leyla Majeri. Don't Blame Us If We Get Playful

Graduating master’s student in visual and media arts (MFA), UQAM

March 10 - April 14, 2018
Opening: Saturday, March 10, 3 p.m.

[More information]

Galerie de l’UQAM shows the exhibition Leyla Majeri. Don’t Blame Us If We Get Playful. Currently completing a master in visual and media arts (MFA) at UQAM, the artist presents a material exploration of the shifting boundaries between nature and culture. Inspired by the work of the gardener, Majeri’s installation reflects on the notion of reciprocity in our relationship to the things and environments that surround us.

The exhibition

A gardener might work by digging through and tending to material stuff, figuring out what it needs to grow and flourish, what sort of relationships need to be forged to create a life, what needs to die. While the studio artist approaches the physical world in a very different way, the relationship with materials remains one of reciprocity, a shifting balance where mastery is gained and lost, where the unexpected springs up. In art, as in gardening, the distinction between the act of cultivating and the object cultivated fades as we try to harness the spirit of that which eludes and surprises us. The artist draws on the practice of gardening to develop a sculptural approach that probes the various materialities, notions and apories emerging at the intersection of art and gardening, thus offering an unusual look at the ambivalent relationship between nature and culture.

Inside the gallery space, art and gardening blur, each practice arriving from a different plane and scale, meeting at ground level to (re)negotiate the limits of matter. Paper, cardboard, plaster and various refuse are sculpted and arranged, not to imitate a garden, but to explore its porous limits. Guided by this eclectic and speculative approach, Majeri draws attention to the intersections of the imaginary, nature and politics, tracing their connections along the way.

The artist

Leyla Majeri’s practice focuses on sculptural installation and film animation, bringing them into relationship with broader themes concerning the ecology of the material, the immaterial and the imagined. Her work has recently been shown at Parisian Laundry (Montréal, 2016); Sounds Like, PAVED Arts (Saskatoon, 2016); Eastern Bloc (Montréal, 2016); and the Festival du nouveau cinéma (Montréal, 2015). She was the recipient of a project grant from the Canada Council for the Arts (2016) and a Grupmuv research grant (UQAM, 2015). In the spring of 2017, Leyla completed a residency at Est-Nord-Est artists’ centre (Saint-Jean-Port-Joli) to research plastic materials and residue. Her first solo exhibition, Harness the Sun (Arprim, Montréal, 2016), began a reflection on the garden, which she now continues at Galerie de l’UQAM. Leyla Majeri is currently completing a master of visual and media arts (MFA) at UQAM.
leylamajeri.blogspot.ca

Public activities

Artist Talk: Leyla Majeri
Part of the L’art observe series
Tuesday, March 27, 2018, 12:45 p.m.
Galerie de l’UQAM
In French
Free admission

Guided tours of the exhibition for groups
Available anytime.
Reservations required with Philippe Dumaine
514 987-3000, ext 3280, or dumaine_allard.philippe@uqam.ca

Support provided by

CCFA_BW_black_96_e     Calq_noir

2018_Passage_gExhibition view, Passage à découvert 2017, Galerie de l’UQAM, 2017

Passage à découvert 2018

Graduating students in visual and media arts (BFA), UQAM

April 27 - May 5, 2018
Opening: Thursday, April 26, 5:30 p.m

[More information]

Passage à découvert is an opportunity to discover the works of tomorrow’s contemporary artists and teachers who will take their place in museums, galleries and schools. The exhibition illustrates the students’ creative vitality, curiosity and freedom and bears witness to recent graduates’ professionalism and the excitement that their projects stir up. Presented each year, this exhibition also reveals the wealth and diversity of the programs offered by the École des arts visuels et médiatiques, which favours a multidisciplinary education.

2018_Radar_g

RADAR 2018

Curators: Doriane Biot, Véronique Hudon, Camille Richard
Coordinator: Philippe Dumaine

May 16 – June 16, 2018
Opening: Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 5:30 p.m

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Galerie de l’UQAM is launching RADAR, a new initiative whereby four students from UQAM's graduate programs in Art History, Museology and Visual Arts will contribute to defining, developing and organising an exhibition. Each year, RADAR intends to structure a set of works, including some from the Collection d’oeuvres d’art de l’UQAM, around a specific issue. This year, as August marks the 70th anniversary of the publication of Refus global, Galerie de l’UQAM plans to explore our current society and the engagement of its artists. This inaugural edition of RADAR will present works that reveal the blue fears, red fears and white fears alluded to by Paul-Émile Borduas in the Refus global manifesto. In today’s world, we have every reason to experience emotional turmoil similar to that of Borduas and his colleagues in 1948. It seems more and more impossible to avoid this sensation of nausea. 70 years after the Refus global, it seems necessary to raise this topic. RADAR 2018 will explore contemporary "nauseas" and how current artists are confronting them.

2018_Laferte-Coutu_gAlexia Laferté-Coutu, Monument National (left), 2017, cast glass, 36.8 x 22.9 x 5.8 cm and Sans titre (right), 2017, cast glass, graphite, blue oxide, 34.3 x 21.6 x 3.8 cm

Alexia Laferté-Coutu. Variations sur une ombre plusieurs fois centenaire

Graduating master’s student in visual and media arts (MFA), UQAM

May 16 – June 16, 2018
Opening: Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 5:30 p.m

[More information]

Through the gesture of soft clay pressing against the exterior surface of historic buildings, Alexia Laferté-Coutu seeks to generate an active relationship to sculpture. She associates this sculptural gesture with the process of cataplasm, an ancient therapy that consisted in temporarily applying a thick paste (clay, plants) onto part of the body in order to absorb toxins. In architectural conservation, this same process is used to clean architectural segments that have been buried under an accumulation of lead dust or pollutants. The application of a paste based on clay and active agents derived from red algae absorbs impurities adhering to the surface of the architecture, thus revealing ancient frescoes, engravings, carved friezes or facades of particular cultural value. In this installation, glass cataplasms crystallized through molding free themselves from their status as objects by suggesting unidentifiable forms and their ever absent positive.



Canada Council for the Arts Canada Council for the Arts

GALERIE DE L’UQAM

Université du Québec à Montréal
1400, Rue Berri, Pavillon Judith-Jasmin, Local J-R 120
Montréal, Québec
Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 6 p.m.
Free admission