2015_piccinini_g2Patricia Piccinini, Sitting Room, 2.30pm, from The Fitzroy Series, 2011, C-Type photograph

Patricia Piccinini. Another Life

September 1st to October 9, 2015
Opening: Friday, September 11 at 7 pm
Exhibition tour with the artist, the curator Joan Fontcuberta and art historian Ariane de Blois: Friday, September 11 at 12:45 pm

Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal
The Post-Photographic Condition
Guest curator: Joan Fontcuberta

[More information]

Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal presents, in partnership with the Galerie de l'UQAM, Another Life, the first solo show of artist Patricia Piccinini in Canada. In keeping with the theme of this 14th edition of the International Biennial of the Contemporary Image, The Post-Photographic Condition, the exhibition Another Life takes an intriguing and ambivalent look at the relationships between species in a context of genetic tinkering. Through photography, video and sculpture, Piccinini creates a world where humans, animals and monsters coexist and even help each other.

The exhibition

On a planet that has been invaded, not by aliens but by images, Patricia Piccinini questions our future as humans. And in doing so, she avoids the monstrous image to concentrate on the image of the monster: monstrum, monstrare. The monster is revealed.

Piccinini parodies monstrosity and demonstrativeness as a kind of apocalyptic precursor. In her surprising and captivating universe, forms drawn from biology and aesthetics swing between Frankenstein and Walt Disney, Pixar and H. R. Giger, and The Island of Dr. Moreau and Dolly the sheep. In the artist’s native Australia, the fauna has evolved endogenously to produce species not found anywhere else in the world. How long will these animals survive if their environments are threatened? As if on a rescue mission, Piccinini has conjured up a new species whose role is to protect endangered creatures. This gesture reminds us that life increasingly pushes the boundaries of nature, resulting in implants, in vitro fertilization, cloning, biotechnology, mutations – in short, genetic tinkering.

Another Life conveys a sense of fascination and horror of the monstrous when it permeates everyday life, as an embodiment of the Freudian uncanny. If human beings are animals that know how and are able to smile, as George Steiner stated, what does post-humanity have in store for us? Will we be able to reject the new barbarism? In all likelihood, we will be capable of doing so only by opting to humanize technology, rather than technologize people.

The artist

Patricia Piccinini was born in 1965 in Freetown, Sierra Leone; she lives and works in Melbourne. Her works have been presented in solo and group exhibitions at the Tolarno Galleries in Melbourne (2015), the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art in Melbourne (2014), the National Portrait Gallery of Australia in Canberra (2014), the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney (2014), the Canberra Museum and Gallery (2013), the Museum of Contemporary Art in Taipei (2013), the Haunch of Venison in London (2012), the Victoria and Albert Museum in London (2011), the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College in Chicago (2011), the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo (2010), the Frye Museum in Seattle (2007), and the Venice Biennale (2003). Her works are included in many public collections in Australia, including those of the National Gallery of Australia, the University of Melbourne, the Waverly City Gallery, and the Parliament House. In 2014, she received the Artist Award from the Melbourne Art Foundation. She is represented by Tolarno Galleries in Melbourne and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery in Sydney. patriciapiccinini.net

Interview with the artist: https://youtu.be/Swx7ewLxyfw

The curator

Over almost four decades of prolific dedication to photography, Joan Fontcuberta (born in Barcelona in 1955) has developed an artistic and theoretical practice, which focuses on the conflicts between nature, technology and truth. He has written a dozen books about aspects of the history, aesthetics and epistemology of photography. He has curated international exhibitions, including Fotografia 2.0 (Círculo de Bellas Artes, PhotoEspaña, Madrid, 2014), Artwork as Collection (FotoColectania, Barcelona, 2013), From Here On (Les Rencontres d’Arles, 2011), Idas & Chaos. Trends in Spanish Photography 1920-1945 (International Center of Photography, New York, 1987). In 1982, he co-founded the biennial photography festival Primavera Fotográfica in Barcelona, and in 1996 he was appointed artistic director of the Arles Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie. Since 2008, he has been president of the Visual Artists Association in Catalonia. He has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Chicago Art Institute, among others, and his works are featured in a number of institutional collections, including at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, and the Centre Georges- Pompidou in Paris. In 2013, he received the Hasselblad Foundation Award.

Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal, 14th edition – The Post-Photographic Condition

For its 14th edition, Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal explores The Post-Photographic Condition, a theme conceived by Catalan guest curator Joan Fontcuberta. The post-photographic era is characterized by the massification of images and by their circulation and availability online. Digital technology not only provokes ontological gractures in photography, but also engenders prodounf changes in its social and functional values. Deployed in 16 exhibition sites, the biennal will feature the works of 29 Canadian and international artists who critically react to this massive presence of images and their unlimited access in our current visual culture. moisdelaphoto.com

The educational booklet

An educational booklet is offered to the public free of charge as a a guide to the exhibition.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
2015_hotte_g2Anne-Renée Hotte, Solistes, 2015, still from the video installation

Anne-Renée Hotte. Solistes

Graduating master's student in visual and media arts, UQAM

September 1st to October 9, 2015
Opening: Friday, Septembre 11, 7 pm

[More information]

Solistes is an installation of video canvases whose cadence is created through a symbiosis of landscapes and human activity. Orchestrated to create a rhythmic progression, through the alternation and juxtaposition of images and their soundtrack, the scenes projected in the gallery space explore the concept of a global community through a diversity of harmonious and dissonant elements. Uniting these sequences is a disjointed symphony that combines irregular breathing with the soft rustle of leaves.

2015_bull_g2Hank Bull. Connexion, exhibition view at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, 2015

Hank Bull. Connexion

Curators: Joni Low and Pan Wendt

October 23 to December 5, 2015
Opening and launch of the catalogue: Thursday, October 22, 5:30 pm

Guided tour of the exhibition with the artist: Thursday, November 5, 5 pm to 6 pm
The artist will be present in the gallery to meet the visitors: Friday and Saturday, November 6 and 7, during the opening hours of the gallery

Exhibition organized and circulated by the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

[More information]

Connexion is a major exhibition of Canadian artist Hank Bull. Relatively unknown to the general public, despite his fundamental importance in the development of visual arts in Canada, Hank Bull takes a central role in a global network of artists and various institutions. The exhibition transforms the personal archives of the artist, covering a period of over fifty years, in a sculptural installation. Neither a retrospective nor an archive exhibition, Hank Bull. Connexion rather seeks to make sense of the materials gathered by the artist throughout his career and highlights an artistic practice based on collaboration .

The exhibition

Since the 1970s, Vancouver-based multimedia artist Hank Bull has acted as a connecting figure between artists and artistic communities internationally. Inspired initially by experimental music, mail art, Fluxus, and the absurdist performances associated with Dada and pataphysics, much of his practice has been ephemeral and dialogic, produced for underground audiences in artist-run and improvised contexts. Performance, communication, and the building of networks have thus often eclipsed the production of material things. Yet, material things have played an important role in his career — as documents, as vehicles of communication, as props, and as aesthetic objects in their own right. Hank Bull: Connexion considers the material traces of a life lived as art, exhibiting the varied collection of the artist as a sculptural installation.

Presented in varying states of order and chaos, this diverse array of things — performance props, photographs, videos, documents, technology — points to a network of relationships with artists and communities around the world. It embodies a collaborative practice that has consistently embraced juxtaposition and exchange across boundaries—whether geographic, temporal, cultural, political, disciplinary or psychic. Bull’s arrangement of objects, in which a decorative ceramic vase might sit comfortably next to a stack of political newspapers or a prop from a film, mirrors the experimentation with collective ways of working, living and being together, that is at the core of his approach. The connections between seemingly incongruous objects spark unexpected associations, while also extending outward to their wider social significance and histories. For Bull, art is a way of being in the world: of responding to, improvising with and sculpting the material of the social. Connexion proposes an expanded notion of the artist as a connector of people.

The artist

Hank Bull was born in Calgary, Alberta in 1949 and now lives in Vancouver. A multimedia artist as well as an arts administrator, he has been an important member of the legendary Western Front Society since 1973. He is also the founder and executive director of Centre A (Vancouver International Centre for Contemporary Asian Art) since 1999. Hank was an early adopter of telecommunications technologies and, between 1978 and 1986, joined a global network of artists who produced collective works using distance transmission of video and text. During an extended trip around the world with artist Kate Craig in the 80’s, he met numerous artists in Japan, Indonesia, India, Cameroon, Yugoslavia and France. In the wake of this experience, he co-founded, with Robert Filliou, The Afro-Asiatic Combine, “to research the influence of African and Asian thought on Western culture.” His work was presented at the Museum of Modern Art (1991) as well as at the Venice Biennale (1986), the Dokumenta in Kassel (1987) and Ars Electronica (1982, 1989). An active member of his community, he served for five years on the Sectoral Committee for Arts and Culture of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and has been a regular contributor to Art Matters, an initiative of Her Excellency Michaëlle Jean, Governor General. His work is part of the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Netherlands Media Art Institute and many private collectors.

The curators

Joni Low is an independent curator and writer living in Vancouver, British Columbia. Recent curatorial projects include Fountain: the source or origin of anything, a large-scale outdoor photographic mural and webwork by Laiwan (The Wall: CBC Plaza, 2014) and Idle Wild by DRIL art collective (Café for Contemporary Art, 2012). Her writing has appeared in numerous exhibition catalogues and in publications including Canadian Art, C Magazine, Fillip, The Capilano Review and Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art. A member of Other Sights for Artists’ Projects and the Doryphore Independent Curators Society, she has held positions at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Long March Space Beijing, and Centre A, where she developed a specialized public library on contemporary Asian art.

Pan Wendt is Curator at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CCAG) in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. He worked as a freelance curator and critic, and was Adjunct Curator at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery from 2007 to 2010. Exhibition credits include James Lee Byars: Letters from the World’s Most Famous Unknown Artist (Mass MoCA, 2004); Colleen Wolstenholme: A Divided Room (CCAG, 2008); Funkaesthetics (with Luis Jacob, Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, 2009); Free Parking (CCAG, 2011); Aganetha Dyck: Guest Workers (CCAG, 2011); Swintak and Don Miller: Artist-Run Bunker, Vol. 1 (CCAG, 2012); and Quotation (CCAG, 2013). He has been co-curator of Art in the Open in Charlottetown since its inception in 2011. He has taught at University of Prince Edward Island, served on numerous local and national juries, and published in various contemporary art journals and catalogues.

The catalogue

The opening of October 22 will also be the opportunity to launch the publication accompanying the exhibition.

The richly illustrated catalog is published by the Confederation Centre Art Gallery in collaboration with the Burnaby Art Gallery. Built in the image of a notebook of the artist, the publication continues the work of the exhibition in creating multiple links between disparate elements of collected archives. The publication also contains essays by Hank Bull, curators Joni Low and Pan Wendt and contributions by Serge Guilbault, Alex Muir, Kevin Rice and Ellen van Eijnsbergen.

Free activities

The artist will give a guided tour of the exhibition on Thursday, November 5, from 5 pm to 6 pm

The artist will be present in the exhibition space to meet the public on Friday and Saturday, November 6 and 7, during the opening hours of the gallery

Guided tours of the exhibition:

Available at any time. Reservations required with Philippe Dumaine, 514-987-3000, ext. 3280, or dumaine_allard.philippe@uqam.ca

Support

CCFA_BW_black_96_e     CALQinb-Converti   CCAG_en

Educational Booklet

An educational booklet is offered to the public free of charge as a a guide to the exhibition.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

2015_bouvier_g2Louis Bouvier, detail of the exhibition TOUT n'est pas un sandwich, 2015, inkjet print, variable dimensions. Photo: Adrien Baudet

Louis Bouvier. TOUT n'est pas un sandwich

Graduating master's student in visual and media arts, UQAM

Octobre 23 through Decembre 5, 2015
Opening: Thursday, Octobre 22, 5:30 pm

[More information]

With his exhibition TOUT n’est pas un sandwich, Louis Bouvier focuses on the discursive potential arising from encounters between various "art" objects. By juxtaposing eras, cultures and ideas, he incites us to question traditional prejudices regarding the artist's craft. Within the gallery space, photorealistic drawings are displayed alongside sculptures and found objects. The nature of the artistic testimony in these works is lost in a profusion of forms and materials, calling into question the precious, sacred and oracular attributes of artistic creation. By mobilizing the conventional codes of exhibitions, TOUT n’est pas un sandwich creates a paradoxical space that undermines – with a degree of irony –modernist ideas of the status of the work of art.


2015_jpaube_rome_gJean-Pierre Aubé, Radio Vaticana, 2015, video still

Jean-Pierre Aubé. Electrosmogs

Curator: Louise Déry

Exhibition presented at RAM radioartemobile (Rome)

May 14 to June 27, 2015
Opening: Thursday, May 14, 7 pm
Round table: Thursday, May 14, 5 to 7 pm

[More information]

The Electrosmogs exhibition by Jean-Pierre Aubé will relate the Electrosmogs series to the V.L.F. Natural Radio project realised in Finland, Scotland and Quebec and offering sound and images of low frequencies emanating from natural phenomena such as the Aurora Borealis. Two new video works will be presented: Electrosmog Venezia, realised during the Venice Biennale, and Radio Vaticana, presenting the capture of the signal from Vatican Radio, one of the world's major sources of radio frequency emissions.

Round table

The opening of the exhibition will be preceded by a round table organized by RAM radioartemobile at 5 pm, with a varied group of researchers and thinkers on the issue of radio frequencies.

Participants:
Jean-Pierre Aubé, artist
Louise Déry, art historian and curator of the exhibition
Giuseppe Di Giugno, physicist focusing, since the 1970’s, on the audio digital, founder of IRIS
Michelangelo Lupone, composer, researcher, designer of soundscapes
Cristian Stanescu, astrophysicist
Luca Zevi, architect and urbanist

Artist Statement

A graduate of the MFA program at the Université du Québec à Montréal, Jean-Pierre Aubé is well known for his sound and visual representations of very low frequencies and radio frequencies using ingenious methods and technologies, which enable him to sound the magnetosphere and space. Over the years, he has become a sort of explorer-artist who, equipped with curious antennas, radio receivers, software of his own making and an array of computer hardware, captures various frequencies and then models this data into singular landscapes, which are displayed via charts, photographs and audio and video recordings.

For the curator Louise Déry, Jean-Pierre Aubé is a landscape artist of a novel genre. A sound and wave magician, he makes us aware of an invisible part of our surrounding world, its poetry, its ecology and the dangers threatening it. She recalls that “artists have always turned their eyes to the sky. I view Jean-Pierre as following in the grand romantic tradition, his head raised towards outer space, both listening and observing it, he evokes its boundlessness while at the same time revealing the congestion which our inexorable technological footprint has brought to this immensity. In a world where the sky is being sold by the piece to meet the demands of the communication industry and in which formidable powers are busy hiding information or spying on the transmitted contents, Jean-Pierre’s work focuses our attention on the vast issues regarding the respect and damage of the planet and its surroundings, and the effect of these practices on each human being.”

 

Jean-Pierre Aubé

Born in 1969 in Kapuskasing, Ontario, lives and works in Montreal.
Education:
MFA, Université du Québec à Montréal
Exhibitions:
Expression (St-Hyacinthe, 2015), Le Fresnoy (Tourcoing, 2013), Canadian Centre for Architecture (Montreal, 2012), Clark (Montreal, 2012), Séquence (Saguenay, 2011), Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2011), AXENÉO7 (Gatineau, 2010), Galerie de l’UQAM (Montreal, 2008 and 2010), Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (Quebec City, 2008), Palais du Tau (Reims, 2008), Ludwig Museum (Budapest, 2007), ZKM (Karlsruhe, 2005)
Performances: Elektra (2012 and 2011, Montreal), MUTEK (2010, Montreal), Mois Multi (Quebec City, 2005), @rt Outsiders (2005, Paris)
Award:
Prix Giverny Capital 2013
www.kloud.org

Louise Déry

Louise Déry holds a PhD in Art History and has been the director of the Galerie de l’UQAM since 1997. Previously, she was curator of contemporary art at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. She has curated numerous exhibitions accompanied by catalogues (Rober Racine, Dominique Blain, Raphaëlle de Groot, Nancy Spero, David Altmejd, Michael Snow, Giuseppe Penone, Shary Boyle, Sarkis…) of which over thirty were shown abroad (Europe, Turkey, the US and Asia). She was the curator of the Canada pavilion at the Venice Biennial with an exhibition by David Altmejd (2007) and in 2013 she returned there to present a performance by Raphaëlle de Groot.

RAM radioartemobile

Platform for contemporary art based in Rome, dedicated to visual and sound research. RAM, born in 2004, has founded the SoundArtMuseum, a permanent archive of sound art works available on-line. RAM LIVE’s programming is streamed live 24 hours a day at
http://live.radioartemobile.it

Adress:

RAM radioartemobile
Via Conte Verde n.15 - Roma
phone: +39 06 44704249
www.radioartemobile.it

2014_videozoomcarrier_pJacynthe Carrier, Parcours, 2012, video still

Videozoom. Between-the-Images

Sophie Bélair Clément, Olivia Boudreau, Jacynthe Carrier, Michel de Broin, Pascal Grandmaison, Frédéric Lavoie,  Aude Moreau

Curators:  La Fabrique d'expositions (Julie Bélisle, Louise Déry and Audrey Genois)

 

McIntosh Gallery, Western University, London (ON)
November 7 to December 14, 2014
Opening: Thursday November 6, 8 pm

 

Foreman Art Gallery, Bishop’s University, Sherbrooke (QC)
April 16 to July 4, 2015
Opening: Wednesday April 15, 5 pm

 

[More information]

Videozoom. Between-the-Images is a videographic anthology of works by seven Quebec artists who define themselves not as filmmakers but as visual artists motivated by the exploration of the image in motion. The works it brings together are all too brief and make no claim to being representative of video and film practice in Quebec in the absolute. A full account of this impressive effervescence would required a far more ambitious format. It should also be borne in mind that many artists – and all those included here – create video works to be exhibited in museums and galleries as installations, their projection conditioned by format and specific equipment in spaces that enable visitors to experience the works in a controlled environment. However, the present exhibition, in the form of a continuous showing of all the works on the same screen, offers the advantage of conveying shared sensibilities, displaying affinities for an often carefully crafted image, attesting to concern for an audio presence and revealing effective elliptical strategies of the image.

This project is offered as a glimpse, an opening, a breach into the immense production of images that characterizes the contemporary world. The works must be viewed as if one were peeping at them through a slit, a sort of “between-the-images,” both for what they represent within contemporary practices and for what they are individually in their respective formal and narrative dimensions: between video and cinema, film and digital image, visual presence and aural reality. This notion of a “between-the-images,” taken from the theorist Raymond Bellour,1 is first of all interesting because it implies we must seek in depth, dig below the surface of the images, and not be content to pass distractedly, superficially, from one to the next. We must not simply linger over the “endless flow” of images. This same notion also implies that the proliferation and saturation of images are not the real problem facing us today. As Pierre Scheffer writes, “We have no idea whether or not we are saturated with images, and we never will. We weren’t there in prehistoric times, when guys were probably saturated with images because their noses were stuck in graffiti in the caves, and it was a lot worse than TV.”2 This remark eludes a widespread assumption to the effect that no one knows how to look at an image any more because there are too many of them. On the other hand, it is our belief that what matters is what occurs between the images, or between them and the sound that accompanies them, or between them and the sound and text that tell their story in parallel. As witnesses to their movement, we must capture their immobility; before these animated figures, we must “re-figure” their image; exposed to their aural dimension, we must seek their silence.

The works gathered together for this edition of Videozoom on Quebec thus provide a moment’s pause to contemplate the work of artists who are among the most captivating and enterprising in investigating the image. These short videos deal with a variety of subjects in the realm not only of politics, popular culture, television and movie imagery but also of the poetical image. The emphasis is sometimes on form, sometimes on narrative or content, while sound, time, the archive, landscape and performance are some of the compositional elements from which what is displayed is constructed.

Several of the works are a function of a specific parameter suggested to the artists: a duration under four minutes. This concentration in time has two consequences. On one hand, such a restriction forces an artist to accelerate the process of giving form to an idea through an image so as to achieve a certain perceptual and narrative effectiveness. On the other hand, a short work can have an effect of slowing down on viewers, who are at liberty to take the time to look carefully, dissect, scrutinize the images one by one to fully appreciate what they see in a time frame that is easier to assimilate than a full-length feature. In the “between-the-images,” a language takes shape between what is perceived and named, what is seen and designated, the world and art. For today, images truly confront us with what they embody or disembody, construct or deconstruct, repeat or reinvent. They are more often a suggestion than a demonstration, and therein lies their appeal.

 

La Fabrique d’expositions, Montreal, October 2012

1. Since the early 1980s, Raymond Bellour has developed a thorough analysis of the connections between film, video, photography and mixed regimes of the image. He founded the cinema review Trafic (1991) with Serge Daney and has published, among other things, L’entre-Images (1990) and L’entre-Images 2 (1999). He collaborated on the exhibition Passages de l’image at the Centre Pompidou and was the curator of Thierry Kuntzel. Lumières du temps and Thierry Kuntzel – Bill Viola. Deux éternités proches at Le Fresnoy in Tourcoing, France.

2. Pierre Scheffer, in Maurice Mourier, Comment vivre avec l’image (Paris: PUF, 1989), p. 340.

2015_videozoom_gPascal Grandmaison, Soleil différé, 2010-2012, video still

Videozoom. Between-the-Images

Sophie Bélair Clément, Olivia Boudreau, Jacynthe Carrier, Michel de Broin, Pascal Grandmaison, Frédéric Lavoie,  Aude Moreau

Curators:  La Fabrique d'expositions (Julie Bélisle, Louise Déry and Audrey Genois)

La Maison folie, Mons, Belgium
Septembre 17 through 27, 2015
Opening: Thursday, Septembre 17

Part of Ailleurs en folie Montréal / Québec
Mons 2015, European Capital of Culture

 

[More information]

Vidéozoom Québec. Between-the-Images is a videographic anthology of works by seven Quebec artists who define themselves not as filmmakers but as visual artists motivated by the exploration of the image in motion. The works it brings together are all too brief and make no claim to being representative of video and film practice in Quebec in the absolute. A full account of this impressive effervescence would required a far more ambitious format. It should also be borne in mind that many artists – and all those included here – create video works to be exhibited in museums and galleries as installations, their projection conditioned by format and specific equipment in spaces that enable visitors to experience the works in a controlled environment. However, the present exhibition, in the form of a continuous showing of all the works on the same screen, offers the advantage of conveying shared sensibilities, displaying affinities for an often carefully crafted image, attesting to concern for an audio presence and revealing effective elliptical strategies of the image.

This project is offered as a glimpse, an opening, a breach into the immense production of images that characterizes the contemporary world. The works must be viewed as if one were peeping at them through a slit, a sort of “between-the-images,” both for what they represent within contemporary practices and for what they are individually in their respective formal and narrative dimensions: between video and cinema, film and digital image, visual presence and aural reality. This notion of a “between-the-images,” taken from the theorist Raymond Bellour,2 is first of all interesting because it implies we must seek in depth, dig below the surface of the images, and not be content to pass distractedly, superficially, from one to the next. We must not simply linger over the “endless flow” of images. This same notion also implies that the proliferation and saturation of images are not the real problem facing us today. As Pierre Scheffer writes, “We have no idea whether or not we are saturated with images, and we never will. We weren’t there in prehistoric times, when guys were probably saturated with images because their noses were stuck in graffiti in the caves, and it was a lot worse than TV.”3 This remark eludes a widespread assumption to the effect that no one knows how to look at an image any more because there are too many of them. On the other hand, it is our belief that what matters is what occurs between the images, or between them and the sound that accompanies them, or between them and the sound and text that tell their story in parallel. As witnesses to their movement, we must capture their immobility; before these animated figures, we must “re-figure” their image; exposed to their aural dimension, we must seek their silence.

The works gathered together for this edition of Vidéozoom on Quebec thus provide a moment’s pause to contemplate the work of artists who are among the most captivating and enterprising in investigating the image. These short videos deal with a variety of subjects in the realm not only of politics, popular culture, television and movie imagery but also of the poetical image. The emphasis is sometimes on form, sometimes on narrative or content, while sound, time, the archive, landscape and performance are some of the compositional elements from which what is displayed is constructed.

Several of the works are a function of a specific parameter suggested to the artists: a duration under four minutes. This concentration in time has two consequences. On one hand, such a restriction forces an artist to accelerate the process of giving form to an idea through an image so as to achieve a certain perceptual and narrative effectiveness. On the other hand, a short work can have an effect of slowing down on viewers, who are at liberty to take the time to look carefully, dissect, scrutinize the images one by one to fully appreciate what they see in a time frame that is easier to assimilate than a full-length feature. In the “between-the-images,” a language takes shape between what is perceived and named, what is seen and designated, the world and art. For today, images truly confront us with what they embody or disembody, construct or deconstruct, repeat or reinvent. They are more often a suggestion than a demonstration, and therein lies their appeal.

 

La Fabrique d’expositions, Montreal, October 2012

1. Louise Déry and the Fabrique d’expositions thank the artists, Mary-Angela Schroth of Sala 1, Pierluigi Matera, director of the Museo di Roma in Trastevere, the Québec Government Office in Rome, the Canada Council for the Arts, the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and UQAM, who contributed in various ways to the realization of this project.

2. Since the early 1980s, Raymond Bellour has developed a thorough analysis of the connections between film, video, photography and mixed regimes of the image. He founded the cinema review Trafic (1991) with Serge Daney and has published, among other things, L’entre-Images (1990) and L’entre-Images 2 (1999). He collaborated on the exhibition Passages de l’image at the Centre Pompidou and was the curator of Thierry Kuntzel. Lumières du temps and Thierry Kuntzel – Bill Viola. Deux éternités proches at Le Fresnoy in Tourcoing, France.

3. Pierre Scheffer, in Maurice Mourier, Comment vivre avec l’image (Paris: PUF, 1989), p. 340.


2014_pad_gExhibition view, Passage à découvert 2014. Photo: L.-P. Côté

Passage à découvert 2015

Graduating students in visual and media arts (BFA), UQAM

 

April 24 to May 9, 2015
Opening: Thursday, April 23, 5:30 pm

 

[More information]

Passage à découvert is an opportunity to discover the works of tomorrow’s contemporary artists and teachers who will take their place in museums, galleries and schools. The exhibition illustrates the students’ creative vitality, curiosity and freedom and bears witness to recent graduates’ professionalism and the excitement that their projects stirs up. Presented each year, this exhibition also reveals the wealth and diversity of the programs offered by the École des arts visuels et médiatiques, which favours a pluridisciplinary education.

moreau_hollywood_gAude Moreau, Untitled (Hollywood Sign), 2015, digital print, 158 x 129,5 cm. Courtesy of galerie antoine ertaskiran, Montreal.

Aude Moreau. The Political Nightfall

Curator: Louise Déry

March 6 to April 11, 2015
Opening: March 5, 5:30 pm

Exhibition tours with the artist and the curator:
Thursday, March 12, 12:45 - 2 pm
and
Wednesday, April 1, 5:30 - 6:30 pm

 

[More information]

The Galerie de l'UQAM presents The Political Nightfall, the first major solo show of artist Aude Moreau. This exhibition features a body of work developed by the artist over the last 7 years, with night-time panoramas of cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Montreal and Toronto. Curated by Louise Déry, The Political Nightfall is produced by the Galerie de l'UQAM in partnership with the Canadian Cultural Centre in Paris, Casino Luxembourg in Luxembourg and The Power Plant in Toronto, institutions where it will be shown.

Galerie antoine ertaskiran, which represents Aude Moreau, also will be exhibiting the artist’s work from March 11 to April 18. 

The exhibition

The photographic, film and sound works of Aude Moreau cast a hitherto unexampled light on the North American city, with its modernist grid, its towers soaring to breathtaking heights, its illuminated logos speaking the language of the multinationals, its solids that box us in, its voids that provide an exit. Because the artist embeds film in architecture, writing in glass, politics in economics, transparency in opacity, indeed the private in the public, she deflects and refashions the iconography of these often stereotypical urban images, whose future shows no way around the gathering political darkness.

The exhibition features the premiere of the film The End in the Background of Hollywood, shot by helicopter over Los Angeles, with the twin towers of the City National Plaza conveying a powerful end-of-the-world message. In tandem, Inside (23/12/2014 - Los Angeles, Downtown) offers a street view of one of the towers and its mundane nocturnal activity, while The Last Image, shows generic endings of films about the end of the world. The starry night of the world film capital is also captured in several photographs showing the iconic Hollywood sign and the illuminated logos of big financial corporations studding the sky. Visitors will revisit Sortir, shot from a helicopter circling the Montreal Stock Exchange, Reconstruction, a moving panorama of the Manhattan skyline from the Hudson River, and discover Less is more or… on Mies van der Rohe's towers in Toronto.

According to the curator, by investing architecture with a metaphorical power that lies between reality and fiction, between the image itself and what it recounts, Moreau makes us spectators of the present: we are subjected to the mechanisms of power and grapple with the catastrophic scenarios that flow by in an endless loop. “The artist’s thinking and observations on the city derive from Gordon Matta-Clark, Ed Ruscha and Mies Van der Rohe; created between 2008 and 2015, the four groups of works included in this exhibition give the leading role to Montreal, New York, Los Angeles and Toronto. They exhort us to immerse ourselves in the texture of their images and sounds, to enter the temporality of a relentless end, to cross through the space between the images and, in that movement, perceive a world at rest, perhaps its final rest”, specifies Louise Déry.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated monograph with essays by the curator and invited authors, such as Kevin Muhlen (Luxembourg) and Fabrizio Gallanti (Princeton University). The launch of the publication is scheduled for September, at the opening of the exhibition at the Canadian Cultural Centre in Paris.

The artist 

Aude Moreau has developed a practice that encompasses her dual training in scenography and the visual arts. Whether with concepts painstakingly developed over several years to produce ambitious installations, films and photographs, or material interventions in an exhibition context, like her famous sugar carpets, Aude Moreau focuses a relevant, critical gaze upon showbiz society, the privatization of the public space, and the domination of the State by economic powers in today's world. Her work has been shown in Quebec, France, the United States and Luxembourg. Aude Moreau has a Master's in Visual Arts and Media from the Université du Québec à Montréal. She is a recipient of the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art (2011), as well as the Powerhouse Prize from La Centrale (2011). Aude Moreau is represented by galerie antoine ertaskiran in Montreal. audemoreau.net

The curator 

With a PhD in art history, Louise Déry has been the Director of the Galerie de l'UQAM since 1997. She has been a curator at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, and has worked with a number of artists, including Rober Racine, Dominique Blain, Nancy Spero, Michael Snow, Daniel Buren, Giuseppe Penone, Raphaëlle de Groot, Shary Boyle and Sarkis. Curator of some thirty exhibitions abroad, including a dozen in Italy, and others in France, Belgium, Spain, Turkey, the United States and Asia, she was curator of the Canada Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2007, with a David Altmejd exhibition, and a performance by Raphaëlle de Groot at the 2013 Biennale. At the 2015 Biennale, she will present several of Jean-Pierre Aubé's interventions on electromagnetic pollution.

Partners

Centre_culturel_canadien  Casino_luxembourg   Power_plant

Support provided by

Conseil_des_arts_ang     Bronfman

2015_moreau_gAude Moreau, Waiting for Landing, 2015, digital print. Courtesy of galerie antoine ertaskiran, Montréal

Aude Moreau. The Political Nightfall

Curator: Louise Déry

Centre culturel canadien, Paris, France
Septembre 25, 2015 through January 13, 2016
Opening and launch of the catalogue: Thursday, Septembre 24

[More information]

After its great success at the Galerie de l’UQAM in spring 2015, Aude Moreau. The Political Nightfall, the first major solo show of the artist, begins a tour that will bring her to Paris, Luxembourg and Toronto. This exhibition features a body of work developed by the artist over the last 7 years, with night-time panoramas of cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Montreal and Toronto. Curated by Louise Déry, The Political Nightfall is produced by the Galerie de l'UQAM in partnership with the Canadian Cultural Centre in Paris, Casino Luxembourg in Luxembourg and The Power Plant in Toronto.

The exhibition

The photographic, film and sound works of Aude Moreau cast a hitherto unexampled light on the North American city, with its modernist grid, its towers soaring to breathtaking heights, its illuminated logos speaking the language of the multinationals, its solids that box us in, its voids that provide an exit. Because the artist embeds film in architecture, writing in glass, politics in economics, transparency in opacity, indeed the private in the public, she deflects and refashions the iconography of these often stereotypical urban images, whose future shows no way around the gathering political darkness.

The exhibition features the premiere of the film The End in the Background of Hollywood, shot by helicopter over Los Angeles, with the twin towers of the City National Plaza conveying a powerful end-of-the-world message. In tandem, Inside (23/12/2014 - Los Angeles, Downtown) offers a street view of one of the towers and its mundane nocturnal activity, while The Last Image, shows generic endings of films about the end of the world. The starry night of the world film capital is also captured in several photographs showing the iconic Hollywood sign and the illuminated logos of big financial corporations studding the sky. Visitors will revisit Sortir, shot from a helicopter circling the Montreal Stock Exchange, Reconstruction, a moving panorama of the Manhattan skyline from the Hudson River, and discover Less is more or… on Mies van der Rohe's towers in Toronto.

According to the curator, by investing architecture with a metaphorical power that lies between reality and fiction, between the image itself and what it recounts, Moreau makes us spectators of the present: we are subjected to the mechanisms of power and grapple with the catastrophic scenarios that flow by in an endless loop. “The artist’s thinking and observations on the city derive from Gordon Matta-Clark, Ed Ruscha and Mies Van der Rohe; created between 2008 and 2015, the four groups of works included in this exhibition give the leading role to Montreal, New York, Los Angeles and Toronto. They exhort us to immerse ourselves in the texture of their images and sounds, to enter the temporality of a relentless end, to cross through the space between the images and, in that movement, perceive a world at rest, perhaps its final rest”, specifies Louise Déry.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated monograph with essays by the curator and invited authors, such as Kevin Muhlen (Luxembourg) and Fabrizio Gallanti (Princeton University). The launch of the publication is scheduled for September, at the opening of the exhibition at the Canadian Cultural Centre in Paris.

The artist

Aude Moreau has developed a practice that encompasses her dual training in scenography and the visual arts. Whether with concepts painstakingly developed over several years to produce ambitious installations, films and photographs, or material interventions in an exhibition context, like her famous sugar carpets, Aude Moreau focuses a relevant, critical gaze upon showbiz society, the privatization of the public space, and the domination of the State by economic powers in today's world. Her work has been shown in Quebec, France, the United States and Luxembourg. Aude Moreau has a Master's in Visual Arts and Media from the Université du Québec à Montréal. She is a recipient of the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art (2011), as well as the Powerhouse Prize from La Centrale (2011). Aude Moreau is represented by galerie antoine ertaskiran in Montreal. audemoreau.net

The curator

With a PhD in art history, Louise Déry has been the Director of the Galerie de l'UQAM since 1997. She has been a curator at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, and has worked with a number of artists, including Rober Racine, Dominique Blain, Nancy Spero, Michael Snow, Daniel Buren, Giuseppe Penone, Raphaëlle de Groot, Shary Boyle and Sarkis. Curator of some thirty exhibitions abroad, including a dozen in Italy, and others in France, Belgium, Spain, Turkey, the United States and Asia, she was curator of the Canada Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2007, with a David Altmejd exhibition, and a performance by Raphaëlle de Groot at the 2013 Biennale. At the 2015 Biennale, she presented several of Jean-Pierre Aubé's interventions on electromagnetic pollution.

Partners

Centre_culturel_canadien Casino_luxembourg Power_plant

Support provided by

Conseil_des_arts_ang Bronfman


2015_memartelnew_gMarie-Ève Martel, working sketch for Transcender l'architecture, 2014.

Marie-Ève Martel. Transcender l'architecture

Graduating master's student in visual and media arts, UQAM

 

January 9 to February 14, 2015
Opening: January 8, 5:30 pm

 

[More information]

Through the study of two distinct buildings— Henry David Thoreau’s cabin at Walden Pond in Massachusetts and the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University—Marie-Ève Martel stages an aesthetic and philosophical dialogue on the “place of knowledge.” Through this dialogue, she seeks to question the way in which we use architecture to build an existential, social/political, and religious/spiritual order. She also sets out to explore this order’s imaginary dimension and psychological impact by presenting two apparently opposite ideological viewpoints: on the one hand, institutionalized, even materialized knowledge; and on the other, free or innate knowledge.

2014_desordremelaniesmith_gMelanie Smith and Rafael Ortega, Bulto, video still, 2011. Courtesy of Galerie Peter Kilchmann, Zurich.

The Disorderliness of Things

Edith Brunette, Michel de Broin, Arkadi Lavoie Lachapelle, Mathieu Lefevre, Emmanuelle Léonard, Christine Major, Maria Marshall, Catherine Opie, Melanie Smith and Rafael Ortega, Pilvi Takala, Rosemarie Trockel

Curators: Marie-Ève Charron and Thérèse St-Gelais

 

January 9 - February 21, 2015
Opening: January 8, 5:30 pm
Exhibition tour with the curators: January 27, 12:45 pm to 1:45 pm

 

[More information]

Curated by Marie-Ève Charron and Thérèse St-Gelais, The Disorderliness of Things features works exploring democratic dimensions of disobedience and disorder that defy authority and convention. Visitors will discover works by Edith Brunette, Michel de Broin, Arkadi Lavoie Lachapelle, Mathieu Lefèvre, Emmanuelle Léonard, Christine Major, Maria Marshall, Catherine Opie, Melanie Smith and Rafael Ortega, Pilvi Takala, and Rosemarie Trockel. The curators and several of the artists will attend the opening.

 

The exhibition

The works in The Disorderliness of Things give voice to the positive aspects of disobedience.

How can art express insubordination in liberal democracies? In this context where our freedoms are relative, how does contemporary art serve as a critic without assuming a militant stance?

Defying authority and convention, all these works create zones of counter-cultural resistance. They unmask what seems, under the inoffensive guise of normalcy, devoid of meaning and offer a political critique of banality. They shake up our predefined realities, often diverting them with humour.

Unconventional scenarios and objects are subjected to the restrictions of customary rules in an urban space. Through simple actions, characters reveal their ability to act and their refusal to be bound by norms or canons. The works defy artistic traditions and imagery. Standard artistic venues are occupied by intrusion. Division within debate takes precedence over the management of the social order by consensus. Some of the works contain blatantly improper figures while others coolly unmask the regulated environments of closed communities. Thus the selected works reveal various forms of conditioning while questioning their authority.

In The Disorderliness of Things, dissent is not an evil to be eradicated, but rather the exercise of critical vigilance where vitality is the ultimate value.

 

The curators

Art critic for Le Devoir, Marie-Ève Charron also writes regularly for the magazine esse arts + opinions of which she was a member of the editorial board. As a catalogue author, her most recent publications have focused on the work of Anthony Burnham, Michael Merrill and Les Fermières Obsédées. She was curator of the group exhibition Au travail (Musée régional de Rimouski, 2010) and, with Marie-Josée Lafortune and Thérèse St-Gelais, co-organized Archi-féministes!, a group exhibition presented at Optica (2011-2012). Since 2004, she has taught art history at UQAM and at the Cégep de Saint-Hyacinthe.

Thérèse St-Gelais is a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) where she teaches the history of contemporary art and the contribution of women to the visual arts. Curator of the exhibitions Ghada Amer (Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, 2012) and Loin des yeux près du corps (Galerie de L'UQAM, 2012), she also has directed colloquia (and their proceedings) on État de la recherche « Femmes : théorie et création » dans la francophonie (2010) and The Undecidable: Gaps and Displacements of Contemporary Art (2008). She co-organized the exhitbition Archi-feministes! (Optica, 2011-2012), with Marie-Ève Charron and Marie-Josée Lafortune.



Canada Council for the Arts Canada Council for the Arts

GALERIE DE L’UQAM

Université du Québec à Montréal
1400, Rue Berri, Pavillon Judith-Jasmin, Local J-R 120
Montréal, Québec
Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 6 p.m.
Free admission